As I have written some time ago, we use OWASP Dependency check in order to scan our product for known vulnerabilities. But when you have reports from many components of the product, you need to manage them somehow. In the previous article, I’ve briefly mentioned our tool that processes the reports. In this article, I’ll present this tool. FWIW, we have open-sourced it. You can use it, you can fork it, you can send us pull requests for it.

Vulnerable libraries view

The vulnerable libraries view summarizes vulnerabilities grouped by libraries. They are sorted by priority, which is computed as number of affected projects multiplied by highest-severity vulnerability. This is probably the most important view. If you choose a vulnerable library, you can check all the details about vulnerabilities, including affected projects. When you decide to update a library to a newer version, you will probably wonder if there is some known vulnerability present in the new library version. The ODC Analyzer allows you to check it after simply entering your desired library version.

One might find the ordering to be controversial, mostly using the highest-rated vulnerability. Maybe the scoring system is not perfect (and no automatic scoring system can be perfect), but I find it reasonable. I assume that highest-scored vulnerability is likely some remote code execution triggerable by remote unauthenticated attacker. In such case, does having multiple such vulnerabilities make the situation worse? Well, it might slightly increase the probability that the vulnerability will be exposed to the attacker, but having two such vulnerabilities can hardly make it twice as bad as having just one. So I wanted one highest-rated vulnerability to be a ceiling of risk introduced by the vulnerable library to the project. Maybe we could improve the algorithm to rate multiple low-severity vulnerabilities higher than the severity of the highest-rated vulnerability. I already have an idea how to do this, but it has to be discussed.

Vulnerabilities view

You can also list all vulnerabilities affecting one of the projects scanned. They are sorted by severity multiplied by number of affected projects. Details available there are mostly the same as in the vulnerable libraries view.

Another interesting feature is vulnerability suppression. Currently, ODC Analyzer can generate a suppression that can be pasted to suppressions.xml, so it is taken into account the next time when running vulnerability scans. We consider making it more smart and moving the suppression to ODC Analyzer itself.

Filters

Unless you have just a single team, most people are probably not interested in all the vulnerabilities of all the projects. They will want to focus on only their projects instead. ODC Analyzer allows focusing on them by filtering only one project or even a subproject. One can also define a team and filter all projects belonging to this team.

Teams are currently defined in configuration file, there is no web interface for it now.

E-mail notifications

One can subscribe to new vulnerabilities of a project by e-mail. This allows one to watch all relevant vulnerabilities without periodic polling of the page.

Export to issue tracking system

We are preparing export to issue tracking system. There is some preliminary implementation, but we might still perform some redesigns. We can export one issue per vulnerability. The rationale behind this grouping is that this allows efficient discussion when multiple projects are affected by the same vulnerability. A side effect of such design is that you need an extra project in your issue tracker and you will might want to create child issues for particular projects.

Currently, only JIRA export is implemented. However, if you want to export it to <insert name of your favourite issue tracker here>, you can simply implement one interface, add a few of code for configuration parsing and send us a pull request 🙂

Some features under consideration

Affected releases

We perform scans on releases. It would be great to add affected releases field to vulnerabilities. We, however, have to be careful to explain its meaning. We are not going to perform these scans on outdated unsupported releases, thus they will not appear there. So, it must be clear that affected releases are not exhaustive in this way.

Discussion on vulnerabilities

We consider adding a discussion to vulnerabilities. One might want to discuss impact on a project. These discussions should be shared across projects, because it allows knowledge sharing across teams. However, this will probably be made in issue tracker systems like JIRA, as we don’t want to duplicate their functionality. We want to integrate them, though.

Better branches support

If a project has two branches, it can be currently added as two separate projects only. It might be useful to take into account that multiple branches of a software belong to the same project. There are some potential advantages:

  • Issues in production might have higher urgency than issues in development.
  • Watching a particular project would imply watching all the branches.

However, it is currently not sure how to implement it and we don’t want to start implementation of this feature without a proper design. For example:

  • Some projects might utilize build branches in Bamboo.
  • Some projects can’t utilize build branches, because there are some significant differences across branches. For example, some projects switch from Maven to Gradle.
  • Is it useful to allow per-branch configuration (e.g., two branches belonging to different teams or watching only one branch)?
  • Should the branches be handled somewhat automatically?
  • How to handle different branching models (e.g. master + feature branches, master + devel + feature branches, …)?

Library tagging

Library tagging is useful for knowing what types of libraries are in the system. It is partially implemented. It works, but it has to be controlled using direct access to the database. There was never a GUI for adding a tag. When you have some existing tags, there is a GUI for adding these tags to a library, but there is no way to add one permission for that.

Homepage

The project was originally designed to be rather a single-page. This did not scale, so we added some additional views. The current homepage is rather a historical left-over and maybe it should be completely redesigned.

List of all libraries

Non-vulnerable libraries are not so interesting, but one might still want to list them for some purposes. While there is a hidden page containing all the libraries (including a hidden CSV output), it is not integrated to the rest of the application. We have needed this in the past, but we are not sure how to meaningfully integrate it with the rest of the system without creating too much of clutter.

Conclusion

We have implemented a tool useful for handling libraries with known vulnerabilities and cooperation across teams. This tool is in active development. If you find it useful, you can try it. If you miss a feature, you can contribute by your code. If you are unsure if your contribution is welcome, you can discuss it first.